Whether religion influences fertility intention: based on the analysis of CGSS data in 2010

LI Feng1

(1.School of Social Development, East China University of Political Science and Law)

【Abstract】With the advent of the era of low fertility rate in China, the academic circle has increasingly studied the fertility intention of the public, and formed an analysis path mainly from the perspective of economics. However, in the face of the reality of rapid development of religion in China, there is little discussion on the influence of religious belief on fertility intention. Foreign scholars have made great achievements in this field, and put forward such classical judgments as particularized theology hypothesis, characteristics hypothesis and minority status hypothesis. Based on the data of CGSS2010, and based on the national conditions and research status in China, this study proposed an analytical framework of religious doctrines, internalization of believers and religious situation, and discussed the influence of religious belief on the number of children people intended to have between the ages of 18 and 45. The results showed that the number of procreations was higher among believers than among non-believers. The fertility intention of Christians is higher than that of traditional Chinese religious believers. For believers, their participation in religious activities is positively correlated with the number of desired children. Religion has an independent influence on individuals’ fertility intention, but secular factors such as demography, socio-economic variables and boy preference for values also have an impact. These findings, to some extent, go beyond the debate between the particularized theology hypothesis and the characteristic hypothesis in overseas academic circle, and also prove the possibility of the influence path of religious ideas outside the perspective of economics in the discussion of the influencing factors of fertility intention.

【Keywords】 religious belief; religious piety; number of desired children; particularized theology hypothesis; characteristics hypothesis;

【DOI】

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    [1]. Birth is not only a natural phenomenon, but also a social phenomenon, which is influenced by various social factors. Generally speaking, as a social phenomenon, fertility intention includes three aspects: the number of willing births, the time of willing births and the sex of willing births. Considering the biggest problem facing China’s population and the content of the data used in this paper, if not stated, we only discuss the number of willing births. [^Back]

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This Article

ISSN:1000-4289

CN: 11-1299/B

Vol , No. 03, Pages 18-34

June 2017

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Abstract

  • 1 Introduction
  • 2 Literature review
  • 3 Analysis of ideas and research hypotheses
  • 4 Data, model and variable processing
  • 5 Data analysis
  • 6 Conclusion and discussion
  • Footnote