Trends in inter-provincial migration distance in China

GAO Xiangdong1,2

(1.School of Public Administration, East China Normal University)
(2.The Center for Modern Chinese City Studies, East China Normal University)

【Abstract】Since the reform and opening up, the scale of China’s floating population has been increasing, and the proportion of inter-provincial migrants has been also increasing. Although there are many studies on the inter-provincial migration of floating population, the studies on the inter-provincial migration distance are rare. Based on the census data of 2000 and 2010, this paper investigates the per capita migration distance and its inter-provincial differences. The results show that the per capita inter-provincial migration distance of floating population increased from 2000 to 2010, from 980.51 km in 2000 to 994.82 km in 2010. There are regional differences in the variation of per capita migration distance. The provincial regions with increased migration distance are mainly distributed in the west, while the provincial regions with reduced migration distance are mainly distributed in the East. There are gender differences in per capita migration distances, and females are more inclined to close migration. In 2010, the average migration distance of males was 1000.75 km, while that of females was 987.01 km. The gender differences in migration distances are shrinking. At the same time, the paper also discusses the influencing factors of inter-provincial migration distance of floating population from three aspects of economic factors, age structure and migration scale.

【Keywords】 floating population; inter-provincial migration; migration distance;

【DOI】

【Funds】 The National Social Science Fund of China (15ZDC035) The National Social Science Fund of China (14AZD027) The National Social Science Fund of China (17BRK012)

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    Footnote

    [1]. ① Northeast China includes Heilongjiang, Jilin and Liaoning. North China includes Inner Mongolia, Tianjin, Shanxi, Hebei, Beijing and Shandong. East China includes Zhejiang, Anhui, Shanghai and Jiangsu. Southern China includes Hainan, Guangxi, Guangdong and Fujian. Central China includes Hunan, Jiangxi, Hubei and Henan. Northwest China includes Xinjiang, Qinghai, Shaanxi, Gansu and Ningxia. Southwest China includes Yunnan, Guizhou, Sichuan, Chongqing and Tibet. [^Back]

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This Article

ISSN:1000-6087

CN: 11-1489/C

Vol 42, No. 06, Pages 25-34

November 2018

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Article Outline

Abstract

  • 1 Introduction
  • 2 Literature review
  • 3 Data and methods
  • 4 Empirical analysis
  • 5 Research conclusion
  • Footnote

    References