Study on China- ROK cooperation in the view of the East Maritime Silk Road

LI Jiacheng1,2

(1.International Politics at the School of International Affairs, Liaoning University)
(2.Institute of Northeast Asia Studies, Liaoning University)

【Abstract】The East Maritime Silk Road has existed since ancient times, and has a long history. The ancient East Maritime Silk Road was with the new vigor again in 2013. Along this East Maritime Silk Road, China and the Republic of Korea (ROK) cooperate beneficially, generate countless rich fruits, and sign the free trade agreement in 2015. On the beneficial basis, China and the ROK ought to continue to join hands, strive to work together, link China’s One Belt and One Road initiative and the ROK’s Eurasia Initiative effectively and sufficiently, and let this East Maritime Silk Road become the strip of friendship and win-win between China and the ROK.

【Keywords】 Maritime Silk Road; One Belt and One Road; China; the ROK;

【DOI】

【Funds】 2014 Youth Project of the National Social Science Fund (14CGJ015) 2012 Youth Project of Liaoning Academy of Social Sciences Planning Fund (L12CGJ007)

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(Translated by DUANweishi)

    Footnote

    [1]. ① According to the official OBOR document issued by three ministries in China, a significant direction of the 21st century Maritime Silk Road starts from coastal ports in China to South China Sea then to the Indian Ocean, and eventually extending to Europe; from coastal ports in China to South China Sea then to South Pacific. Refer to National Development and Reform Commission, Ministry of Foreign Affairs, and Ministry of Commerce: “The vision and action of building the Silk Road Economic Belt and 21st century Maritime Silk Road.” Xinhua News Agency (2015–03–28). http://news.xinhuanet com/2015-03/28/c_1114793986. htm. Retrieved on March 28, 2015. It has clearly undermined the historical existence and strategic importance of the East Maritime Silk Road. A majority of scholars still consider the west and east end of the Maritime Silk Road as Europe and southeast coast of China respectively, which evidently neglected northeast coast of China and Northeast Asia. [^Back]

    [2]. ② China always has three commodities that are sold around the globe. It could be said that they would be even more helpful than weapons in terms of entering a country. They are silk, tealeaves, and china. [^Back]

    [3]. ① Zhu, Y. Guangming Daily (光明日报), Page 7 (2015–3–22). [^Back]

    [4]. ② The flight distance from Seoul to Beijing is only 940 kilometers. There are even sayings that “one can hear the crowning of roosters on the ROK’s Baengnyeong Island from a small city in Shandong Province in China. As a matter of fact, the straight-line distance is approximately 174 kilometers. Former president of the Liaoning University Feng Yuzhong has also put forward a “four closeness theory” to describe the relations between China and the ROK, i.e. closeness in history, culture, geography, and emotion. [^Back]

    [5]. ③ Major ancient classics on records on seaways connecting China and the ROK include Records of the Grand Historian(史记),Annals of Qin Shi Huang, (Vol.6) that describes Xu Fu’s (city) sail to Joseon; Vol. 115Treatise on Chosun that describes navy’s arrival at the Bohai Sea in Han Dynasty; Book of Han(汉书), Treatise on Geography (Vol.26 ) that describes Confucius’ arrival at Dongyi; the Book of Jin:Four Barbarian Tribes (晋书·四夷传) that describes how Ma Han made use of traverse roads; the Book of Southern Qi (南齐书), Treatise on Dongyi (Vol.58)that describes how Jia Ye made use of traverse roads, Book of Wei in Records of the Three Kingdoms (三国志) that describes southwest coasts of the Korean Peninsula during Wei Dynasty; Annals of Huanghuasida (皇华四达记)(Annals of Daoli), and Travelling from Dengzhou to Joseon Bohai Sea route written by Jia Dan who travelled from Dengzhou to Qingzhou along sea routes, Travel Notes in the Tang Dynasty for Learning Buddhism (入唐求法巡礼行记)written by Japanese priest Ennin that describes how he made use of traverse roads along the Yellow Sea, Maps of Diplomatic Missions to Joseon Dynasty During the Reign of Emperor Xuanhe (宣和奉使高丽图经) written by Xu Jing from the Northern Song dynasty that describes travelling along traverse roads in the South, and History of Song(宋史), Annals of the Joseon Dynasty (Vol. 487) that describes traverse roads in the South. Major books on seaways connecting China and the ROK include Lin, S. A Famous Harbor on the Maritime Silk Road—Ningbo (海上丝绸之路的著名海港—宁波) Beijing: China Ocean Press, (1990); Quan, H. Zhedong Culture(浙东文化), (2001) ; Sun, G. Journal of Maritime History Studies(海交史研究), (1997); Dong, Y. Collections of Zhedong Culture (浙东文化集刊), Shanghai: Shanghai Ancient Books Publishing House, (2005); Jin, R. History (历史学), Vol. 204; Jung, S.Studies on History of Civilization Interchange(文明交流史研究), Sakyejul Publishing Ltd., (2002) and Studies on Civilization Interchange(文明交流研究), (2) (2001). [^Back]

    [6]. ④ (South Korea)Jung, S. The Silk Road (丝绸之路), (8): 52 (2014). [^Back]

    [7]. ⑤ Some scholars also call the East Maritime Silk Road as the North Maritime Silk Road. Professor Zhu Yafei from Shandong Normal University believes that the North Maritime Silk Road first started during Qin and Han dynasties. At that time boats only started from Langya (Jiaonan), Zhifu (Yantai) and Penglai in Shandong Province, headed north along Shandong coast, passed through Changshan Island, and transferred at Laotieshan Mountain locating at the south end of Liaodong Peninsula. They would then head down along the west coast of the DPRK, cross the Tsushima Strait and eventually into Japan. The waterway started from Shandong Peninsula to Liaodong Peninsula, to Korean Peninsula and eventually into Japan islands gradually became a regular route for maritime trade. On the other hand, Heilongjiang Province proposed the East Continental-Maritime Silk Road Economic Belt. Refer to Yan,C. & Qin, Y. Dalian Daily (大连日报). http://szb.dlxww.com/dlrb/html/2010-10/17/content_413530.htm. Retrieved on October 17, 2010. [^Back]

    [8]. ① National Development and Reform Commission, Ministry of Foreign Affairs, and Ministry of Commerce: Xinhua News Agency. http://news.xinhuanet com/2015-03/28/c_1114793986. htm. Retrieved on March 28, 2015. [^Back]

    [9]. ① (South Korea) Lee, H. & Choi, J. Contemporary Korea (当代韩国), (3): 21 (2014). [^Back]

    [10]. ① Niu, L. World Affairs (世界知识), (5): 29 (2015). [^Back]

    [11]. ② Zhao, D., Yao, J. & Wang, D. http://opinion.caixin.com/2015-05-25/100812369.html. Retrieved on May 25, 2015. [^Back]

    [12]. ① Liu, S. http://chinese.joins.com/gb/article.do? method = detail&art_id=113215. Retrieved on December 18, 2013. [^Back]

    [13]. ① Liang, G. http://www.ftchinese.com/story/001061687. Retrieved on April 23, 2015. [^Back]

    [14]. ② National Development and Reform Commission, Ministry of Foreign Affairs, and Ministry of Commerce: Xinhua News Agency. http://news.xinhuanet com/2015-03/28/c_1114793986. htm. Retrieved on March 28, 2015. [^Back]

    [15]. ③ National Development and Reform Commission, Ministry of Foreign Affairs, and Ministry of Commerce:. Xinhua News Agency. http://news.xinhuanet com/2015-03/28/c_1114793986. htm. Retrieved on March 28, 2015. [^Back]

    [16]. ① National Development and Reform Commission, Ministry of Foreign Affairs, and Ministry of Commerce: “The vision and action of building the Silk Road Economic Belt and 21st Maritime Silk Road”. Xinhua News Agency. http://news.xinhuanet com/2015-03/28/c_1114793986. htm. Retrieved on March 28, 2015. [^Back]

    [17]. ②Park Geun-hye. Yonhap News Agency. http://chinses.yohapnews.co.kr/allheadlines/2014/07/04/0200000000ACK20140704002300881.HTML. Retrieved on July 4, 2014. [^Back]

    [18]. ③ National Development and Reform Commission, Ministry of Foreign Affairs, and Ministry of Commerce. Xinhua News Agency. http://news.xinhuanet com/2015-03/28/c_1114793986. htm. Retrieved on March 28, 2015. [^Back]

    [19]. ④ National Development and Reform Commission, Ministry of Foreign Affairs, and Ministry of Commerce. Xinhua News Agency. http://news.xinhuanet com/2015-03/28/c_1114793986. htm. Retrieved on March 28, 2015. [^Back]

This Article

ISSN:1007-483X

CN: 11-3467/D

Vol , No. 02, Pages 17-26

June 2015

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Article Outline

Abstract

  • 1 Exploring the modern implication of the East Maritime Silk Road
  • 2 The connectivity of China-proposed One Belt and One Road and the ROK-proposed Eurasia Initiative
  • 3 The design and composition of China-the ROK cooperation from the perspective of the East Maritime Silk Road
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