‍Cost and dilemma: new exploration on the alliance theory

ZHANG Jingquan1 LIU Lili2

(1.Northeast Asian Studies College, Jilin University)
(2.School of Public Administration, Jilin University)

【Abstract】There are close relations between alliance cost and alliance dilemma with alliance function. Alliance cost includes the alliance hard cost and the alliance soft cost. The former includes alliance organization cost and alliance action cost, while the latter includes alliance reputation and alliance credibility. Alliance dilemma includes traditional alliance dilemma and new alliance dilemma. The former includes entrapment and abandonment, while the latter includes identity dilemma which means alliance target and alliance economic partner is the same actor, and inter-alliance dilemma which means different alliances in same alliance system creates suspicion and dispute among themselves. The interaction between alliance cost and alliance dilemma will affect the running of alliance.

【Keywords】 alliance cost and dilemma; alliance hard cost; alliance soft cost; identity dilemma about alliance target and alliance partner; inter-alliance dilemma;

【DOI】

【Funds】 General Project of National Social Science Foundation of China (12BGJ010) Major Project of Key Research Institute of Humanities & Social Sciences of Ministry of Education of China (12JJD810025)

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(Translated by LINmanzhen)

    Footnote

    [1]. ① In January 2015, Vice Admiral Robert Thomas of the United States Seventh Fleet mentioned the possibility of Japanese naval air force going on patrol in the South China Sea. In June 2015, Center for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS) of the U.S. issued Southeast Asia’s Geopolitical Centrality and the U.S.-Japan Alliance, which explored the combined actions of America and Japan in South China Sea. [^Back]

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This Article

ISSN:1003-7411

CN: 22-1180/C

Vol 25, No. 02, Pages 11-22+127

March 2016

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Article Outline

Abstract

  • 1 Alliance cost
  • 2 Alliance dilemma
  • 3 Alliance cost and internal and external interaction of alliance dilemma
  • Footnote

    References