Landmark attraction effect and landmark repulsion effect on representational momentum in airplane movement scene

YAN Bihua1 LIU Xiaomin1 LIU Haozhe1

(1.School of Psychology, Shaanxi Normal University and Key laboratory of behavioral and cognitive neuroscience in Shaanxi Province, Xi’an, China 710062)

【Abstract】Two landmarks, safe and dangerous landmarks, were set. The induction movement paradigm was used to investigate the relative relationship between the moving target and the associated landmark, the impacts of the direction of the target movement, the meaning of the associated landmark and the presentation time in the airplane movement scene on the judgment of the location of the target movement. The results show that: (1) In the airplane movement scene the airplane had strong representational momentum. (2) The representational momentum of the airplane approaching the safe landmark was greater than that of the airplane moving far away from the safe landmark, while the representational momentum of the airplane approaching the dangerous landmark was smaller than that of the airplane moving far away from the dangerous landmark. The safe landmark showed attraction effect, while the dangerous landmark showed repulsion effect. (3) The highly correlated safe and dangerous landmarks made the airplane’s representational momentum independent of the movement direction. (4) The safe and dangerous landmarks presented during the retention interval (RI) increased the representational momentum of the airplane. Conclusion: The landmark effect of representational momentum is subject to the landmark meaning, and the representational momentum is subject to the causal relationship between the target and the landmark and the meaning of the scene.

【Keywords】 representational momentum; landmark attraction effect; landmark repulsion effect; scene; forward displacement;

【Funds】 Foundation of Humanities and Social Sciences Research Program of Ministry of Education (14YJA190012) Shaanxi Provincial Key Laboratory Post-Subsidy Cultivation and Construction Project (2016SZsj-29)

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(Translated by WEN JX)

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This Article

ISSN:0439-755X

CN: 11-1911/B

Vol 50, No. 07, Pages 703-714

July 2018

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Article Outline

Abstract

  • 1 Introduction
  • 2 Experiment 1a: the representational momentum of the safe landmark during induction
  • 3 Experiment 1b: representational momentum of dangerous landmarks during induction
  • 4 Experiment 2a: representational momentum of the safe landmark presented during the RI
  • 5 Experiment 2a: representational momentum of the dangerous landmark presented during the RI
  • 6 Comparison of data between Experiment 1 and Experiment 2
  • 7 General discussion
  • 8 Conclusions
  • References