Crime and social governance in Mexico

YUAN Yan1

(1.Latin America and the Caribbean Research Center of Southwest University of Science and Technology, Mianyang 621010)

【Abstract】Currently Mexico is one of the most crime-ridden countries in Latin America. Besides increasing criminal activities such as robbery and theft, it is facing rampant drug-related crimes, constituting a threat to national and local governance systems. Violence and crime are viewed as most concerned issues both by policy-makers and the masses. The state has launched numerous anti-crime programs, but failed to improve the situation. Deteriorating public security is closely related to social and economic problems such as large unemployment population, widespread poverty, wide income gap, and high school dropout of the youth. It can be concluded that Mexico needs a comprehensive reform to improve social governance to effectively combat crime.

【Keywords】 Mexico; social safety; organized crime; comprehensive reform; American factor;

【DOI】

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(Translated by ZHONG Yehong)

    Footnote

    [1]. ① On September 26, 2014, 43 students of Ay-Otzinapa Normal University, Guerrero, Mexico mysteriously disappeared together in Iguala. The investigation found that they were murdered and burnt by police and local crime group. [^Back]

    [2]. ② Instituto Nacional de Estadística,Geografía e Informática,“Defunciones por Homicidio,Nacional”.http://www3.inegi.org.mx/sistemas/biinegi/?e=0&m=0&ind=6300000264 [^Back]

    [3]. ③ INEGI of Mexico carries out the National Survey on Victimization and Perception of Public Security annually. In 2014, it carried out a sampling interview survey of 95,516 households across the country. The crime situation mainly included the stolen of vehicles or parts of vehicles, burglary, theft on a bus or on the street, robbery, stealing, fraud, extortion, verbal threats, body injury, kidnapping and sexual assault., with the exception of drugs smuggling and organized crime. This article quotes the materials and statistics from the investigation of this INEGI. The details of INEGI are presented on the following site:“ Encuesta Nacional de Victimizaci6n y Percepcion sobre Seguridad Publica(ENVIPE)2014”. http: // www. inegi. org. mx/est/contenidos/proyectos/encuestas/hogares/regu- laxes/ envipe/ envipe2014/ default, aspx [^Back]

    [4]. ① Eduardo Guerrero-Gutiérrez,“Security,Drugs,and Violence in Mexico:A Survey”,prepared for the 7th North American Forum,Washington D.C.,2011,p.28. [^Back]

    [5]. ②③ Kimberly Heinle et al.,“Drug Violence in Mexico:Data and Analysis through 2013”.https://justiceinmexico.files.wordpress.com/2014/04/140415-dvm-2014-releasered1.pdf [^Back]

    [6]. ① Stephen D.Morris,“Corruption,Drug Trafficking,and Violence in Mexico”,in The Brown Journal of World Affairs,Vol.xviii,Issue ii,Spring/Summer 2012,p.31. [^Back]

    [7]. ② Banamex,“Encuesta Nacional de Valores:Lo Que Une y Lo Que Divide a los Mexicanos(ENVUD)2010”,p.30.http://centrolindavista.org.mx/observatoriopropaz/public/Documentos/formacion/2.pdf [^Back]

    [8]. ③ INEGI,“Censo Nacional de Gobierno,Seguridad Pública y Sistema Penitenciario Estatales(2014)”,p.9.http://www.inegi.org.mx/est/contenidos/proyectos/censosgobierno/cngspspe2014/default.aspx [^Back]

    [9]. ① Quoted fromEdith Olivaxes Ferreto, “Condiciones Sociolaborales de los Cuerpoa Policiales y Seguridad Pfiblica”,en Andlisis PolHico, diciem- bre 2010,p. 7. [^Back]

    [10]. ② Maureen Meyer,“Mexico’s Police:Many Reforms,Little Progress”,p.5.http://www.wola.org/sites/default/files/Mexicos%20Police.pdf [^Back]

    [11]. ③ Clare Ribando Seelke,“Supporting Criminal Justice System Reform in Mexico:The U.S.Role”,pp.5-6.https://www.fas.org/sgp/crs/row/R43001.pdf [^Back]

    [12]. ④ Clare Ribando Seelke and Kristin Finklea,“U.S.-Mexican Security Cooperation:The Mérida Initiative and Beyond”,p.6.https://fas.org/sgp/crs/row/R41349.pdf [^Back]

    [13]. ⑤⑥ Centro de Análisis Políticas Públicas,“La Cárcel en México:Para qué”,en México Evalúa,2013,p.5,p.7.http://www.mexicoevalua.org [^Back]

    [14]. ① Secretaría de Seguridad Pública,“Mexico and the Fight against Drug Trafficking and Organized Crime:Setting the Record Straight”,March 2009,p.1. [^Back]

    [15]. ② “Segundo Informe de Gobierno 2013-2014”,p.69.http://www.presidencia.gob.mx/segundoinforme [^Back]

    [16]. ① John Bailey and Matthew M.Taylor,“Evade,Corrupt,or Confront?Organized Crime and the State in Brazil and Mexico”,in Journal of Politics in Latin America,No.2,2009,p.19.http://www.casede.org/BibliotecaC asede/38-38-1-PB.pdf [^Back]

    [17]. ② Javier Osorio,“Las Causas Estructurales de la Violencia”,en JoséAntonio Aguilar(Coord.),Las Bases Sociales del Crimen Organizado y la Violencia en México,la Ciudad de México,Centro de Investigación y Estudios sobre Seguridad,2012,pp.99-103. [^Back]

    [18]. ① INEGI,“Encuesta Nacional de Seguridad Pública Urbana(ENSU):Cifras Correspondientes a diciembre de 2014”,p.12.http://www.inegi.org.mx/inegi/contenidos/espanol/prensa/comunicados/percepcionsp.pdf [^Back]

    [19]. ②Kimberly Heinle et al.,“Drug Violence in Mexico:Data and Analysis through 2013”,p.46.https://justiceinmexico.files.wordpress.com/2014/04/140415-dvm-2014-releasered1.pdf [^Back]

This Article

ISSN:1002-6649

CN: 11-1160/C

Vol 37, No. 02, Pages 30-36+80

April 2015

Downloads:3

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Article Outline

Abstract

  • 1 The current social security situation in Mexico
  • 2 Social governance in Mexico
  • 3 Review on Mexico social governance
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